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Milonga con Traspié

In this week's class, we focused on milonga con traspié. We had several people stay after class, because they were so excited about milonga... so we ended up running out of time to do the instructional part of the video... we will try to do one next week for this class.. but here are some highlights in text:

 

We started with more milonga basics of keeping the simple, regular time rhythm of 1, 2, 1, 2 by changing weight.

With all of these steps, we focus on:

* keeping the rhythm. Both the man and woman are responsible for holding the rhythm.

* staying relaxed and trying to release any tension in the embrace and especially in our hips and legs. This will help with quickly switching weight.

* precision footwork by bringing our feet completely together when we can.

* mixing dancing to the single, regular time rhythm and dancing double time. In my opinion, lots of people look like they are just running around the dance floor during milonga, because they are trying to dance double time the whole time. I prefer dancing in regular time and using double time more sparringly.

:07 to :16
Then we step outside partner, bringing out feet together and changing weight to the rhythm. Then we step back and change weight to the rhythm and repeat.

:17 to :21
Then we step outside partner, bring our feet together, change weight and immediately step back, change weight and back forward outside partner and repeat.


:25 - Traspié to the Side
There is a lot of confusion over the term traspie. Some think of it as a stumble step or as dancing in double time (quick-quick). While these are partly true, I think a more accurate definition is using the same leg twice. Some say it comes from the term "pie detras" which means "foot behind." I think this is a very accurate description of what happens.

We start the side traspié by stepping outside partner with our right, then we take a step to the side with our left and then forward AGAIN with the our left, leaving the right foot behind. So, we use our left to step to the side and then re-use it again to step forward.

We can also think of traspié as rebotes (rebounds) or arrepentidas (repents). We often do traspiés in double time or as syncopated steps, but that is not what defines a traspié. But do keep in mind that when some teachers talk about traspié they are using it as a synonym for double time or syncopation.

:44 - Here I step back and then perform a side traspie and back to collection. Then I take a forward step and another side traspie and back to collection. Then immediately to a back traspie and continue back.

1:36 - Mix n' Match Traspiés
Here we do a string of traspiés forward, side and back for both the leader and the follower. You can see here that we can mix and match the traspiés. I can do forward while she does back or we can both go forward or both go back etc.

 

Basic Ganchos and Linked "El Pulpo Style" Ganchos

In this class, we look at basic gancho technique and more advanced concepts such as linked "El Pulpo Style" ganchos.



Norberto "El Pulpo" Esbrez was a true maverick of tango. His linked ganchos are what gave him the nickname "El Pulpo / The Octopus." This class is an homage to him and his influence on our dance and our approach to tango. 

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Tanda of the Week 61: Rodolfo Biagi con Alberto Amor

This week's tanda is low key tanda by Rodolfo Biagi with Alberto Amor singing. We usually think of Biagi as being more rhythmic and staccato, but with Alberto Amor his signature sound is more calm. The rhythm is still there, but more subdued. This is a great tanda for the end of the evening. "Seamos Amigos" is another great song that could go in this tanda.

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Tanda of the Week 60: Juan d'Arienzo with Alberto Echague

This week's tanda is spirited set by Juan d'Arienzo with Alberto Echagüe singing. "El Rey del compás" (The Rhythm King), as D'Arienzo was known, worked with many great singers. But, to me, Alberto Echagúe's canyengue style of singing was a perfect match for the rhythmic nature of D'Arienzo's orchestra. They recorded 27 records in the 1930's and "Trago Amargo," was the last before Echagüe left D'Arienzo's orchestra. He did return to D'Arienzo twice more, from 1944 to 1957 and 1968 to 1975.

Translation of Mandria: http://poesiadegotan.com/2009/09/03/mandria-1926